Open question: Do you capitalize quotes that fall in the middle of sentences?

I run into this all the time, yet I’ve never found a definitive usage rule.

Here’s an example:

Let’s say I have a sentence that goes on a bit, and then, in the middle, I drop a quote that says something like “We were tired and angry, but we persevered,” and then I continue on with the rest of my sentence.

Should that quote be capitalized if it falls in the middle of the sentence?

Specifically, should I do this?

… I drop a quote that says something like “We were tired and angry, but we persevered,” and then I continue …

Or should I do this?

… I drop a quote that says something like “we were tired and angry, but we persevered,” and then I continue …

The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) recommends the fragment guideline: Capitalize the first letter if the mid-sentence quote is a full sentence and make the first letter lowercase when the quote is a fragment.

I’m inclined to trust OWL, but I’d also like to know how others handle this.

Notable things: Yup, that’s how Twitter works; why The Daily bit it; holiday decorating done big and done right

Bob Lefsetz on the realities of Twitter:

Just because you tweet, don’t expect your followers to see it. Few view their feed comprehensively. They check in and check out. Catching only bits and pieces. Even forgetting your fake and dormant followers, which are voluminous, far fewer than fifty percent of your followers see one of your tweets. Actually, I’d be stunned if 10-15% of your active followers see one of your tweets.

10-15% is generous. I’d put it closer to 2%.

Regardless of the specific number, this point stands: To harness Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn or any other platform we have now or in the future, you must acknowledge the limitations and work with them.

(Related: I didn’t even know Lefsetz was on Twitter. I get his updates via email.)


The Daily’s problem was simply that they weren’t conceived to operate on $5 or $6 million per year in revenue. A smarter, smaller team could.

+1


” … they are about to be taught a lesson in the real use of power. You will be witnesses.” — Hans Gruber

To all the chuckleheads out there who wrap a single string of lights around an evergreen and call it “decorating,” I offer this:

(Watch the whole thing. Also, God bless the people who live across the street from this house.)

The Long Tail and iPhone app usage: Nothing surprising here

From The New York Times: The average iPhone or iPod Touch owner uses 5 to 10 apps regularly, according to Flurry, a research firm that studies mobile trends. This despite the surfeit of available apps: some 140,000 and counting. I’ve…

From The New York Times:

The average iPhone or iPod Touch owner uses 5 to 10 apps regularly, according to Flurry, a research firm that studies mobile trends. This despite the surfeit of available apps: some 140,000 and counting.

I’ve seen the same stat mentioned before. Heck, I referenced that stat in a piece I wrote. But what I find surprising is that anyone is surprised by this. It’s the behavioral equivalent of the Long Tail: a few apps get frequent use — the blockbusters — while the others wane after post-installation popularity or, even worse, don’t get downloaded at all.

Instead of this broad-based stuff, what I’d really like to see is data that links up people’s interests/professions with their most-used apps.