Now this is a conclusion

The “conclusions” sections of research reports are often dry, and occasionally impenetrable.

Here’s what those sections should aspire to:

We hope other researchers will find the data we have collected useful and that this publication will help raise some awareness that, while everybody is talking about high class exploits and cyberwar, four simple stupid default telnet passwords can give you access to hundreds of thousands of consumer[s] as well as tens of thousands of industrial devices all over the world. [Emphasis added.]

From the fascinating Internet Census 2012.

Forgiveness for the inconsistent blogger

Khoi Vinh captures the anxiety of a lapsed blogger in this lovely sentence:

What I really need is to write a blog post that clears the decks, one that owns up to how starkly impersonal my posts have been for months now, and essentially gives me permission to start trying to write again.

Everyone should give themselves the chance to try again.

Newspapers’ odd infatuation with unnecessary explanation [Quote]

The software industry has a concept known as “legacy code,” meaning old stuff that is left in software programs, even after they are revised and updated, so that they will still work with older operating systems. The equivalent exists in…

The software industry has a concept known as “legacy code,” meaning old stuff that is left in software programs, even after they are revised and updated, so that they will still work with older operating systems. The equivalent exists in newspaper stories, which are written to accommodate readers who have just emerged from a coma or a coal mine. — Michael Kinsley, “ Cut This Story!