I’m so glad this marketing consultant got in touch with me

I got this in my inbox today from a “marketing consultant.”

Foddernetwork.com Team,

I thought you might like to know some reasons why you are not getting enough Social Media and Organic search engine traffic for Foddernetwork.com.

Wait, wait! I know this one!

I’m not getting enough “Social Media” (capital “S,” capital “M”) and “Organic search” (capital “O,” not sure why it’s a lowercase “s”) because it’s been years since those sites were updated.

That little fact is what makes the postscript on the original message so confusing:

PS I: I am not spamming. I have studied your website and believe I can help with your business promotion …

Two things:

1. When you say you’re not spamming you most definitely are spamming.

2. If you clicked through to any of the sites listed on foddernetwork.com you’d see they ceased publishing quite a long time ago. Your extensive study of my web properties must have missed that. Odd.

And while I’ve got you here, esteemed marketing consultant, here’s a tip: Your tone needs work. You can think I’m an idiot, but don’t let me know that.

A quick and useful introduction to inbound marketing funnels

Rand Fishkin (@randfish) of SEOMoz put together a fantastic introduction to inbound marketing funnels. Here’s the video:

The video’s associated blog post includes an example of SEOMoz’ funnel. I appreciate that it features RSS as a channel. Too often RSS is overlooked — or ignored entirely — in favor of flavor-of-the-month social platforms. It’s important to understand your total reach, and to do that you have to know all of your engagement channels.

Conferences and custom mobile apps: Yup, that makes sense

Attendees at the LeWeb conference held earlier this month had an extra organizational tool at their disposal: a custom iPhone app. I cannot believe how much sense this makes. As app frameworks become more common, and development costs come down,…

Attendees at the LeWeb conference held earlier this month had an extra organizational tool at their disposal: a custom iPhone app.

I cannot believe how much sense this makes. As app frameworks become more common, and development costs come down, I can see a point in the next two years when conference apps move from novelty to must-have. Sort of like Wi-Fi (but hopefully more reliable).

And let’s not forget the sponsorship opportunities here, either. A smart sponsor could use the app to send a hyper-targeted message to a hyper-targeted audience. Toss in some sort of booth contest, and you’ve got the marketing equivalent of the Death Star’s tractor beam.