Judging Dell’s Twitter revenue against company revenue misses the point

If Dell turned heads last year when it claimed to have made $1 million through Twitter, its revised estimate for 2009 is going to cause nasty neck pulls: the company says Twitter revenue jumped to $6.5 million. (I’m assuming that…

Twitter and DellIf Dell turned heads last year when it claimed to have made $1 million through Twitter, its revised estimate for 2009 is going to cause nasty neck pulls: the company says Twitter revenue jumped to $6.5 million. (I’m assuming that spans multiple years.)

The Guardian has a nice bit of analysis on the announcement. It’s informative and interesting. It weaves in some contextual bits. But nestled amidst the numbers is the “drop in the bucket” paragraph that always pops up in these types of stories:

Although $6.5m sounds impressive, when you compare it with the net revenue of $12.3bn Dell reported in the first quarter of fiscal year 2010 it becomes clear that this is only a drop in the ocean …

Sorry. I guess that’s a ” drop in the ocean” paragraph. You get the idea.

I understand the need to insert this text. Its absence would surely raise a red flag for editors and consumers alike. But there’s an underlying perspective here that I believe is damaging, and I wish more analysts would call this out.

Social media exists in a space totally different from traditional business. Activity takes place at the edges, not the center. It’s ambiguous. It’s fleeting. Because of all this, judging social media efforts against traditional channels obscures the real analysis and the real opportunity.

What’s notable about Dell’s Twitter revenue is that it went from $1 million in 2008, to $3 million in June ’09, to $6.5 million now. That’s an enviable trajectory in any business, but it’s doubly impressive here because Dell is making actual money through a nascent system. It found a way to put social media’s tricky architecture to work.

That’s key. Digital disruption is wiping out the fat revenues from traditional models. Many businesses will get smaller simply because consumers have more power and more choice. The companies that find ways to make money within this new landscape — even relatively small amounts of money — have a better shot at adaptation.

Images courtesy Dell, Inc. and Twitter, Inc.